A visit to – Dezzig, France

Dezzig is a company based in France and the main focus is on old printing techniques – namely screen printing. Dezzig artists create handmade large-format posters with a perfectly recognizable style: solid colors, thoughtful composition, clever illustrations, and elegant typography. Its purpose is simple: to bring graphic design and craftsmanship back to basics. 

Now there’s one thing printing posters, but here you have to print several layers. You actually only print one colour at the time, so you can imagine the process being time consuming. You might be wondering why they bother..  I’ve asked Dezzig a few questions. 

– Why do you choose to print this way? 
The purpose of Dezzig is simple: publish the work of designers reviving traditional printing techniques. I’ve always loved paper, engraving… So I created this workshop to become a true craftsman. For a graphic designer, It is logical and natural to practice screen printing: a must to find the meaning a work of art and pleasure to create original artwork. That’s why I created Dezzig turning back to all-digital.
Le projet de Dezzig est simple : éditer le travail des graphistes en utilisant des techniques d’impression traditionnelle. J’ai toujours aimé le, le papier, la gravure… Je voulais donc créer un atelier et devenir un peu artisan, Pour un designer graphiste, la sérigraphie est une continuité logique, un must pour retrouver le sens du travail artistique et le plaisir de l’objet d’art. C’est pour ça que j’ai créé Dezzig en tournant le dos au “tout numérique”. 

– What makes screenprinting so special? Wouldn’t it be easier to use a good printer? 

Screenprinting is well suited for designs that have large areas of solid color. It allows exceptional render on beautiful paper : thick inked, metal ink, transparency, color brightness. Nothing to do with ordinary digital print and offset! Yet it is a hard job, there is no automatic printing machine to make all by pushing a button! Here, everything is done by hand. But it’s worth it! You can feel under the fingers land-forms left by ink on paper, it’s magic! No printer can produce this level of quality.
La sérigraphie est parfaitement adapté pour les aplats de couleurs, elle permet un rendu sans équivalent sur de beaux papiers : épaisseurs d’encrage, transparences des encres, effets métaliques, rendu des couleurs. Pourtant c’est un gros travail, il n’y pas de machine automatique pour tout faire en appuyant sur un bouton ! Ici tout est manuel. Mais le rendu final en vaut la peine ! On peut sentir sous les doigts les reliefs laissés par l’encre sur le papier, c’est magique ! Aucune imprimante ne peut rivaliser avec une tel niveau de qualité.
– How long does it take to make a poster? 

With screenprint, each color is printed separately with a separate artwork for each layer of color. This means that for a run of 100 posters in 3 colors, I take my paper and place it 300 times on the table! Depending on the difficulty and the number of colors, a printing may take 1-3 days to complete.
En sérigraphie chaque couleur est imprimée séparément. Ce qui veut que pour un tirage de 100 affiches en 3 couleurs, il faut passer 300 fois les feuilles ! En fonction de la difficulté et du nombre de couleurs, un tirage peut prendre 1 à 3  jours.
Today, we’ve been allowed in behind the scenes. I’m excited to be able to show you their office. It is such a fabulous industrial workplace and it has obviously been carfully thought out. 

Dezzig has also come up with a nice product for displaying posters – the POSTER PANT. Another quality product from this company. It’s beechwood, made in France and available to buy in their shop
all photos by Dezzig
Look out for new poster collaborations in the comming weeks! 
I learned some new things. Hope you did too!
Thanks, to Dezzig for answering my questions!!
hx

2 Responses

  1. Mariela R.

    Such a great experienced you had to saw all that in person, thanks for sharing!

    X x

  2. Katrin

    Beautiful story, beautiful pictures – and an amazing art work. Love the typewriter!

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